Artificial intelligence powerhouse IBM has had it with law enforcement?s misuse
of facial recognition technology.

In aletter to Congress
[https://www.ibm.com/blogs/policy/facial-recognition-susset-racial-justice-reforms/] this week, IBM CEO Arvind Krishna outlined the different ways the tech company
intends to address racial injustice and police abuse. ?IBM would like to work
with Congress in pursuit of justice and racial equity, focused initially in
three key policy areas: police reform, responsible use of technology, and
broadening skills and educational opportunities,? Krishna wrote.

As part of its effort to responsibly use technology, Krishna explained how
facial recognition tools are misused for mass surveillance, racial profiling,
and human rights violations, and said the company would no longer offer ?general
purpose IBM facial recognition or analysis software.?

The letter also acknowledged the?inherent bias?built into these tools and called
for more testing and reporting on how they are used and often abused. In the
past, IBM?s own tools have come under scrutiny for how they were used to?train
systems about race and gender.?In March of 2019, the company was caught scraping
millionsof Creative Commons-licensed Flickr photos, without acquiring the
permission of the people photographed, as part of a diversity initiative to
combat AI bias.

It only took mass nationwide protests after the police killing of George Floyd
for IBM to finally learn its own lessons about creating responsible artificial
intelligence tools and software.

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